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An Initiative A Day 5.3: Coordinate the region’s transit systems for joint marketing, information technology, and fare media, including information regarding private transit resources such as university/health system shuttles, private bus services, airport transportation, etc.

February 12, 2014 in Vibrant NEO 2040, Vision

 On February 25, the NEOSCC Board will be voting on the the Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Action Products.  Everyday over the next 5 weeks,  we will be sharing an “Initiative A Day” so you can gain a better understanding of the vision and framework!  If you would like to read all of the Initiatives, you can download them here Vibrant NEO Recommendation and Initiatives.

Show your support for Vibrant NEO 2040 by adding your name to our Champions of Vibrant NEO 2040 list here!

Initiative 5.3: Coordinate the region’s transit systems for joint marketing, information technology, and fare media, including information regarding private transit resources such as university/health system shuttles, private bus services, airport transportation, etc.

WHAT THIS MEANS: Transit users want the same ease of planning their travel as a motorist. Regardless of what operator is driving the bus and how many transfers are needed, riders should be able to plan their trips at one common website, pay with one common fare media, and track their trip on one mobile app. While transit ridership grows based on frequency, span, and location of service, transit ridership is kept through high quality of service. The infrastructure required to implement this initiative exists and requires only the common agreement to direct resources to implement it.

Information technology can contribute immensely to improving the experience of transit. The widespread deployment of computer aided dispatch (CAD) and automatic vehicle location (AVL) information infrastructure can be translated into a solution for resolving uncertainty associated with frequency and wait time. Many transit systems with high-capacity bus and rail service have implemented a “next bus” or “next train” information system that reads and broadcasts data from a CAD/AVL system onto station monitors. Greater Cleveland’s Regional Transit Authority implemented such an information system on the HealthLine BRT. In recent years, with the rise of mobile technology, some systems are implementing “real time arrival” information systems that broadcast vehicle location and estimated arrival times at stations and stop in a dynamic, real time environment. The rapid evolution of this technology, especially Google Transit, which operates on the General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) information indexing system, promises to bring real time arrival technology within budgetary reach of smaller transit systems.

Fare technology has also advanced rapidly, making farecard deployment and inter-system fare integration much more technically and financially feasible. for medium-sized transit system. Washington, DC’s SmarTrip card, for instance, integrates farebox payment systems between the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority and the Maryland Transit Authority, enabling seamless transfer between systems for riders.

Beyond technology-based enhancements to the customer experience, transit operators frequently coordinate operations with private transit operators such as university and health system shuttles, private paratransit services, and airport transportation. Public operators also occasionally engage in joint marketing campaigns to encourage ridership of transit in general. Joint marketing campaigns are frequent occurrences in Los Angeles and San Francisco, large metro regions with a decentralized transit operator network much like Northeast Ohio’s.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT: With financial resources for transit already scarce and growing scarcer, r transit operators must make savvy investments in improvements to “soft” infrastructure that can attract more customers to the service. Social media has created new opportunities for budget-friendly, cross-platform marketing and promotion of transit service, which, compounded with participation from multiple partners, can yield savings in marketing budgets that can be channeled to other uses. Investing in fare integration technology extends the spatial reach of transit systems, but arguably the highest-return investment is in real-time arrival information systems.

GETTING IT DONE: Transit operators should lead implementation of this initiative, evaluating their current information infrastructure, upgrading needs, and communications budget. MPOs can help to offset the cost of such investments through allocations of Congestion, Mitigation, and Air Quality (CMAQ[1]) funds or flexing of Surface Transportation Program (STP) dollars to transit agencies. CMAQ funds have been used elsewhere in the country to support everything from summer air quality awareness campaigns promoting transit to implementation of fare integration technology.

Lead

Transit Operators; Metropolitan Planning Organizations; Municipalities, Counties; Universities

Target Community

Strategic investment areas, asset risk areas, cost risk areas

Implementation Complexity

Moderate

 

These recommendations, initiatives, and products, are not one-size-fits all and some aspects of the initiatives won’t be applicable everywhere in the 12-county region. The Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Products are intended inspire and guide decision-making at the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), Council of Government, and local levels to ensure that land use, transportation, and environmental considerations are simultaneously addressed by their processes. Ultimately, the implementation of Vibrant NEO 2040 is up to Northeast Ohio’s communities and residents. But regardless of the applicability of each initiative to any particular part of the region, the goal for each community within the Vision is the same: stability, prosperity, and a high quality of life for all of its residents.


 

An Initiative A Day 5.2: Create a network of high-frequency express and local transit routes connecting the region’s job centers.

February 11, 2014 in Vibrant NEO 2040, Vision

On February 25, the NEOSCC Board will be voting on the the Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Action Products.  Everyday over the next 5 weeks,  we will be sharing an “Initiative A Day” so you can gain a better understanding of the vision and framework!  If you would like to read all of the Initiatives, you can download them here Vibrant NEO Recommendation and Initiatives.

Show your support for Vibrant NEO 2040 by adding your name to our Champions of Vibrant NEO 2040 list here!

Initiative 5.2: Create a network of high-frequency express and local transit routes connecting the region’s job centers. Prioritize infill development in the corridors served by these routes. In the short and medium terms, upgrade high-performing existing bus routes and create new bus routes in designated corridors. In the long term, upgrade the highest-demand routes into commuter rail service.

You can access a full size version of this image by downloading the Vision Chapter at bit.ly/1eBGUZ0

WHAT THIS MEANS: Drawing on the approach of Initiative 5.1, this initiative calls for a focus on bus and rail routes that already carry high levels of ridership and serve critical connection needs within their communities, expanding the service on these routes and corridors to make transit a means of travel that is competitive with automobiles. Expansion of service means both increasing service frequency at key times of the day as well as extending the hours of the day that service is provided. In the case of inter-jurisdictional service coordination, this also means extending the length of service so that single routes are bounded by major origins and destinations—and not simply by political boundaries. It can also mean introducing express or limited-stop service between key destinations so that places with high concentrations of rider activity (such as major employment and shopping centers and university and college campuses) can be connected in shorter times. This also means investing strategically in relatively low-cost capital improvements—such as traffic signal infrastructure that gives priority to transit vehicles —that can improve the performance of transit service and offset the operational delays of frequent stops and starts that can come from high ridership demand.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT: Transit providers focus on high-performing routes and services to retain existing riders and attract new riders. They often prioritize service enhancements on these routes and strategic routes that connect to them so that transit becomes a more attractive and convenient travel option. When partnered with a regional approach to providing service between key activity centers (and focusing less strictly on adhering to county boundaries), many of these high-demand services can form the basis of a series of ‘trunk routes’ that orient transit service within a community and even throughout the region.

GETTING IT DONE: As in 5.1, this initiative must be led by transit operators with planning support as needed from the region’s MPOs. But whereas 5.1 focuses on service between major regional job and activity centers, this initiative involves recalibrating the county-level networks to optimize connections local and express services and a broader regional transit network. In this respect, initiative 5.2 should follow planning and institutional coordination work occurring in 5.1, and involve tighter collaborations between individual transit operators and MPOs.

BEST PRACTICE: The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority completely refurbished 8.3 miles of historic Euclid Avenue as part of the Euclid Corridor Transportation Project, which opened fully in 2008. A bus rapid transit line, the HealthLine, now connects the central business district with major cultural, medical, and education users – all at one-fourth the cost of light rail. The transit project has helped catalyze $4.7 billion in spin-off investment and 11.4 million square feet of new and planned development, offering a successful example of the economic leverage potential for BRT. http://www.riderta.com/routes/HealthLine

http://www.rtahealthline.com/healthline-what-is.asp

 

Lead Transit Operators; Metropolitan Planning Organizations; Municipalities, Counties
Target Community Strategic investment areas, asset risk areas
Implementation Complexity Moderate

 

These recommendations, initiatives, and products, are not one-size-fits all and some aspects of the initiatives won’t be applicable everywhere in the 12-county region. The Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Products are intended inspire and guide decision-making at the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), Council of Government, and local levels to ensure that land use, transportation, and environmental considerations are simultaneously addressed by their processes. Ultimately, the implementation of Vibrant NEO 2040 is up to Northeast Ohio’s communities and residents. But regardless of the applicability of each initiative to any particular part of the region, the goal for each community within the Vision is the same: stability, prosperity, and a high quality of life for all of its residents.

An Initiative A Day 5.1: Invest in a regional network of bi-directional public transit connections between Northeast Ohio’s major job centers.

February 7, 2014 in Vibrant NEO 2040, Vision

On February 25, the NEOSCC Board will be voting on the the Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Action Products.  Everyday over the next 5 weeks,  we will be sharing an “Initiative A Day” so you can gain a better understanding of the vision and framework!  If you would like to read all of the Initiatives, you can download them here Vibrant NEO Recommendation and Initiatives.

Show your support for Vibrant NEO 2040 by adding your name to our Champions of Vibrant NEO 2040 list here!

Recommendation 5: Enhance and coordinate the region’s rail and bus services

Transit is an important layer of infrastructure and community services throughout the region because it carries a large number of people in a small amount of travel space. This allows dense concentrations of employment—a hallmark of a vibrant economy— accessible to a larger workforce without an accompanying expansion to the road network. In Northeast Ohio, taxes raised at the county level support transit service within that county. With notable exceptions, there is limited inter-jurisdictional crossover or coordination of service between counties. Strategic coordination and connection of different transit systems can offer one of the prime assets of any region: seamlessly connecting people to jobs across county and municipal lines. This would allow the region to take advantage of its multiple employment and activity centers and position itself as a dynamic, integrated regional economy.

This kind of coordination happens at multiple scales: it involves regional route planning to coordinate and enhance services along important regional corridors, but it also involves inter-jurisdictional coordination of service schedules, stop locations, common information sources, one fare media for all providers, branding and marketing, and other more detailed factors of transit service to ensure that different transit agencies’ local systems work together to provide high-quality region-wide service. At its heart, though, this recommendation is intended to take advantage of the ongoing commitment of Northeast Ohio communities to public transit, find greater strength in this service through strategic coordination, and enhance the existing transit services to become more than the sum of their parts.

POLICY: Create a comprehensive regional transit plan that crosses county boundaries. Regional public transportation coordination focuses on maximizing the benefits of the public transportation investment through the coordination of services. Currently, there is no overall regional transit plan for Northeast Ohio.

TOOL: AMATS Public Transportation Needs Assessment: The Public Transportation Needs Assessment report identifies and describes the public transportation needs of the AMATS Area between 2010 and 2030. In the process of identifying the area’s transportation needs, several important AMATS transportation objectives were considered:

• System Preservation
• Basic Mobility for All Persons
• Cost-Effectiveness and Efficiency of Travel
• Coordination among the Area’s Transportation Providers
• Safety and Security
• Environmental Impacts
• Support for the Planning Objectives of the Area Communities
• Support of the region’s Economy

A transit needs assessment like the one employed by AMATS that expands beyond an MPO’s planning boundaries to encompass the needs and patterns for the entire region, especially as they relate to commuting, would be a good first step in identifying ways to improve accessibility and mobility. http://www.amatsplanning.org/

TOOL: ODOT Program Resource Guide

TOOL: Unlocking MPO Funding Tools to Support Sustainability

Northeast Ohio should consider the following specific initiatives to achieve this:

Initiative 5.1: Invest in a regional network of bi-directional public transit connections between Northeast Ohio’s major job centers.

WHAT THIS MEANS. Transit today in Northeast Ohio is made up of a series of county-based authorities that offer limited services to other counties. Although this responds to the primary service needs within an individual county, it does not necessarily respond to the dynamics of the regional economy, especially when residents of a particular county may work in another part of the region.

This initiative would maintain all transit operators’ primary missions of serving their local communities, while expanding the traditional service area boundaries to connect the region’s primary job centers. This initiative would allow transit to better respond to the region’s existing and emerging economic driver industries and extend the range of modal choice available to Northeast Ohio employees. It does not need to mean that each transit agency commits to offering extensive service outside of its core boundaries, but rather that a regional system of high-frequency express services becomes part of the regional transportation network.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT Economically strong and vibrant regions offer multiple transportation choices. In an era of growing travel demand but increasingly limited funds for transportation infrastructure expansion, transit service utilizing existing corridors and infrastructure becomes a key approach to offering transportation choice beyond local services in a way that is responsive to the needs of a regional economy. It also provides a basis for focusing land use and economic development policy on the region’s key employment and activity centers, as transit represents a public investment that must be managed to return the greatest possible value to the counties that support it.

Strategic integration of services also offers a potential benefit to individual transit agencies: as transit becomes a more convenient and attractive travel option, agencies are likely to see an increase in their overall ridership. This introduces economies of scale to an otherwise separated set of transit providers and offers the potential for a greater return on the funding committed to transit service. Northeast Ohio’s expansive geographic area likely means that there will continue to be a need for inter-system transfers in using transit, but the coordination of service and location of route transfers at key regional centers—especially centers of employment—may reduce the number of transfers being made and reduce the time a given rider spends on a transit commute.

GETTING IT DONE: This initiative will require leadership from transit operators, with support from NEOSCC and regional planning partners, particularly the region’s four MPOs, TeamNEO, and the Fund for Our Economic Future. NEOSCC and regional planning partners can pursue further study of the corridors highlighted in the Vision Map, leading corridor identification and analysis studies. With transit operators serving Northeast Ohio communities generally incorporated by county, however, it is advisable for the partnership to first explore and identify a range of suitable organizational structures for operating continuous service across jurisdictional boundaries in critical employment corridors. This will ensure that planning proceeds with sensitivity to institutional parameters.

A number of stakeholders must be involved in implementing a truly regional transit system that connects the region’s major job centers. Given the complexity of the task and the scale of the region’s geography, implementation should build on existing partnerships and begin with small, achievable steps. The region’s transit agencies meet regularly on operational issues and have participated in crafting the Vibrant NEO 2040 Recommendations and Initiatives through a “transit caucus” convened for that purpose. This caucus could collaborate on the implementation of these Recommendations and Initiatives. The MPOs have the capacity to bring together transit, business, and community interests within their jurisdictions: the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency’s Transit Council is a functioning partnership that could serve as a model platform for identifying and addressing the practical issues of creating the public/private and interagency partnerships that will be required to implement this recommendation.

Lead

Transit Operators; Metropolitan Planning Organizations

Target Community

Strategic investment areas, asset risk areas

Implementation Complexity

High

These recommendations, initiatives, and products, are not one-size-fits all and some aspects of the initiatives won’t be applicable everywhere in the 12-county region. The Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Products are intended inspire and guide decision-making at the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), Council of Government, and local levels to ensure that land use, transportation, and environmental considerations are simultaneously addressed by their processes. Ultimately, the implementation of Vibrant NEO 2040 is up to Northeast Ohio’s communities and residents. But regardless of the applicability of each initiative to any particular part of the region, the goal for each community within the Vision is the same: stability, prosperity, and a high quality of life for all of its residents.

Initiative A Day 2.1: Strengthen regional job centers—and the corridors that connect them

January 26, 2014 in Vibrant NEO 2040, Vision

On February 25, the NEOSCC Board will be voting on the the Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Action Products.  With just under 40 days to the vote and 41 initiatives in the vision, we thought it would be good to create a countdown to the vote.  Everyday over the next 5 weeks,  we will be sharing an “Initiative A Day” with you so you can gent a better understanding of the vision and framework!  If you would like to read all of the Initiatives, you can download them here Vibrant NEO_Recs&Init_010114.  

Show your support for Vibrant NEO 2040 by adding your name to our Champions of Vibrant NEO 2040 list here

These recommendations, initiatives, and products, are not one-size-fits all and some aspects of the initiatives won’t be applicable everywhere in the 12-county region.  The Vibrant NEO 2040 Vision, Framework and Products are intended inspire and guide decision-making at the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), Council of Government, and local levels to ensure that land use, transportation, and environmental considerations are simultaneously addressed by their processes. Ultimately, the implementation of Vibrant NEO 2040 is up to Northeast Ohio’s communities and residents. But regardless of the applicability of each initiative to any particular part of the region, the goal for each community within the Vision is the same: stability, prosperity, and a high quality of life for all of its residents.

 

Recommendation 2: Develop a robust network of regional job centers connected by multimodal transportation corridors within and between counties

Initiative 2.1: Strengthen regional job centers—and the corridors that connect them—by diversifying and intensifyingland uses and investing in strategic local economic development within them.

WHAT THIS MEANS. Jobs are key to securing Northeast Ohio’s future health and prosperity, and quality places are key to securing jobs. With the generational preferences about what constitutes a “quality place” shifting toward values such as walkability, accessibility, and mixing of uses, communities and employers alike are scrambling to create contexts where people can and want to work. Northeast Ohio must recognize this and act decisively if it is to remain competitive with other regions.

One component in strengthening regional job centers and corridors is to address and remove provisions in land use plans and zoning codes that discourage dense, mixed-use projects, or make them difficult to deliver. This can involve a host of strategies discussed elsewhere in these recommendations, from creating mixed-use or planned unit development overlays to reducing or eliminating parking minimums. By developing more flexible and streamlined zoning and administrative review processes, municipalities make an important contribution to reducing the high transaction costs facing developers and employers and ease their ability to deliver the kind of dense, diversified places where people increasingly want to work and live.

Some Northeast Ohio communities will want to be even more deliberate, targeting development in the regional centers identified in the Vibrant NEO 2040 vision map. Municipalities can encourage such development by making targeted investment in the physical infrastructure, social services, and marketing of the place—or by identifying and cultivating local stakeholders. Cleveland’s HealthLine bus rapid transit (BRT) investment is the strongest local example of such as deliberate development strategy.

The City of Cleveland’s decade’s long partnership with the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (GCRTA) and four stakeholder-led local development corporations and improvement districts —University Circle, MidTown Cleveland, the Campus District, and the Downtown Cleveland Alliance—along the 5-mile Euclid Corridor between Downtown Cleveland and University Circle, the city’s major cultural district. The city and GCRTA collaborated to undertake a complete upgrade of the transit service on this heavily travelled corridor, replacing curb-running local bus service with articulated busses running in an exclusive center median right-of-way. The development corporations partnered with the city and each other to coordinate significant reinvestment in the properties along the corridor. These public-private partnerships have resulted in a transit oriented corridor with an impressive cluster of educational, medical and cultural institutions, private businesses, and business incubators focused on health care and health innovation, a major growth field in the 21st century.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT. An economically strong Northeast Ohio requires jobs located on sites that are both accessible to the region’s population and well-served by the region’s freight networks. Concentrating employment so complementary businesses can be near each other helps to create relationships and linkages that drive value creation. Concentrating businesses also allows transit to serve multiple employers and their employees with efficient routes. Providing for freight connections to these concentrated areas also reduces shipping time and cost, increasing the economic viability throughout the centers.

The Cleveland Opportunity Corridor is an example of a center- and corridor-based redevelopment strategy currently under development through a partnership of the City of Cleveland and the State of Ohio. The Opportunity Corridor envisions constructing a boulevard to connect the rapidly expanding University Circle neighborhood into the region’s roadway network. (citation: Ohio Department of Transportation, Cleveland Opportunity Corridor, http://www.dot.state.oh.us/projects/clevelandurbancoreprojects/opportunitycorridor/Pages/default.aspx).

While the project proposal envisions both substantial adaptive reuse of existing properties and the intensification of existing land uses, (highlighted in 3.4), the major public investment proposed is limited to the development of a new highway. A infrastructure planning strategy that incorporates the full range of transportation modes will be the appropriate approach for most urban employment corridors and centers.

GETTING IT DONE. The region already has a strong framework of centers and connective corridors, but action will need to happen on several levels in order to capitalize on the potential of the framework. Local governments will need to lead the way on getting land use right, reviewing and revising zoning codes and plans as necessary, and engaging local stakeholders to target investments in the job centers and corridors of the future. Transportation investments will occur through the Ohio Department of Transportation and local transit agencies, which should be coordinated with local government’s efforts via MPOs and COGs. In addition to coordinating public sector stakeholders, MPOs and COGs should play a key role in collecting and disseminating best practices.

POLICY: Nurture the Region’s Industry Clusters: Organizing the region strategically around clusters of regional specialization can help target investment decisions and reduce duplication of effort. These efforts should focus on how to make the region’s successful clusters grow and prosper and enable the region to be proactive in terms of funding and other opportunities.

PILOT PROJECT: The Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron – an exceptional collaboration of Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron General Health System, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Summa Health System, The University of Akron and The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation – is focused on patient-centered innovation and commercialization at the intersection of biomaterials and medicine. The strategic alignment of institutional, state, federal and philanthropic support, accompanied with Akron’s rich legacy in industrial and materials science, is working to pioneer the next generation of life-enhancing and life-saving innovation that will transform Akron and the surrounding region into a model for biomedical discovery and enterprise. http://www.abiakron.org/

Lead

Municipalities, Townships, Counties; Metropolitan Planning Organizations, Councils of Governments

Target Community

Strategic investment areas, asset risk areas, cost risk areas

Implementation Complexity

Moderate

Transportation as a Civil Rights Issue Forum on Thursday

June 11, 2013 in Transportation

You are invited to participate in a discussion titled “Transportation as a Civil Rights Issue.” The keynote speaker for the discussion will be Samuel Gresham Jr., former head of the Columbus Urban League and the Ohio Commission on African American Males. Mr. Gresham Jr. is current chair of Common Cause Ohio.

The discussion will take place at CSU’s Levin College of Urban Affairs (1717 Euclid Ave.) at 4pm on June 13th. For more information visit Bike Cleveland site.

GCRTA HealthLine named ‘Best BRT in USA’

April 17, 2013 in cleveland, Transportation

Photo by Joshua Gunter, The Plain Dealer

The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) recently received a Silver rating for the HealthLine – the highest ranking of a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) System in United States.

The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) presented the award for the HealthLine to Joseph Calabrese, CEO and General Manager, RTA, as well as to Mayor Frank Jackson, City of Cleveland, for its support of the project, on Tuesday, April 16 at 200 Public Square.

“The HealthLine is an example of how BRT can help to revitalize city centers, speed commutes, improve air quality, and leverage investment and development near transit, as we’ve seen with Cleveland,” said Walter Hook, ITDP CEO. “We consider the HealthLine to be a best practice for BRT in the US, and our hope is that it encourages other US cities to adopt this cutting-edge form of mass transit.”

Former Senator George Voinovich supported this project from his many years in Cleveland and served as its champion.

“It is a credit to the dedicated staff at RTA and the City of Cleveland that the HealthLine has been rated by the BRT Standard as the highest-quality bus rapid transit corridor in the United States,” said George Voinovich, retired Senator. “The HealthLine has not only dramatically improved transportation options from downtown to University Circle, it’s also been a catalyst for nearly six billion dollars of real estate investment along Euclid Avenue and is contributing a great deal toward revitalizing the city.”

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Streetcars resurfacing in Cincinnati, Ohio!!!

December 18, 2012 in News, Sustainability, Transportation

The Cincinnati Streetcar is an electric mode of transportation operating in its first phase on a 3.6-mile loop connecting key communities in the city’s urban core. The streetcar will be a vital complement to the city’s existing Metro and other transportation systems. The vision remains to create a streetcar system that spurs development and is part of a larger multimodal transportation system that links areas outside the downtown core and throughout the region. Each streetcar will hold about 165 passengers and will easily accommodate wheelchairs and bicycles.

The streetcar is expected to generate 3,700 trips per day, and it will provide residents using the bus system with more accessibility options. By creating denser, mixed-use development with a population that is less reliant on automobiles, the streetcar will reinforce the walkability of the City. Whether travelling to work, school, shopping, restaurants or social activities, all residents will find use for the streetcar. The Cincinnati Streetcar will connect many of the major investments in housing retail, greenspace, and commercial activity currently under way in the Downtown, Uptown, and Over-the-Rhine neighborhoods.  For more information about the Cincinnati Streetcar, visit the website at http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/streetcar/.

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